Representatives of Key Global Institutions

Messages from representatives of major global institutions

World Day of Remembrance ‪#‎WDR2016

 

From the Statement by Dr Etienne Krug, WHO & UNRSC, 20 November 2016

Like every year, on this World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, we mark the occasion by honouring the more than 1.2 million people killed on our road’s every year, and the many millions more who are injured. As the World Health Organization and partners have advocated for nearly two decades, there are solutions to this human-made calamity. Countries must accelerate action to improve laws and enforcement on risks like speeding; redesign roads with protective infrastructure such as sidewalks;  and ensure that vehicles everywhere are equipped with life-saving technologies. This year’s World Day of Remembrance highlights the fact that even after a road traffic crash occurs, there is an enormous opportunity to save lives and reduce disability. Countries can do this by providing timely emergency care, medical treatment, psychological support, and rehabilitation for the injured. They should also investigate crashes and provide justice to the injured and bereaved…….

For full message and messages in other languages: http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/en/

 

Video message from  Dr Etienne Krug, Chair of the UN Road Safety Collaboration:

 

 

UN Secretary-General’s message for World Day 2016

Today, like every day, more than 3,400 people will lose their lives on the world’s roads – many of them young men and women at the start of their adult lives. The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims is a time to reflect on this tragic loss of life. It is also a time to scale up action to prevent these deaths, and the countless injuries. That means improving the quality and safety of roads and vehicles, preventing speeding and drunk driving, and vigorously promoting the use of seat-belts, motorcycle helmets and child car seats. We must also focus on post-crash response, the theme of this year’s World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims. We can save lives and reduce disability by providing timely emergency care, better medical treatment and psychological support, and early rehabilitation for the injured. Today, too many countries fail to provide effective care for road traffic victims after a crash. Many also fail to investigate crashes thoroughly and provide fair settlements for the injured and bereaved. Worldwide, there is great disparity in access to emergency care. Some 90 per cent of the world’s road fatalities occur in low and middle-income countries. It is estimated that if emergency care systems for seriously injured patients in these countries could be brought up to the levels of high-performing nations, an estimated 500,000 lives could be saved each year. Better post-crash response is critical to achieving Sustainable Development Goal target 3.6 to reduce by 50 per cent by 2020 the number of people killed and injured in road traffic crashes. On this World Day of Remembrance, in honour of those killed and injured each year, let us take the necessary steps to make our roads safe for all.

http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/en/

http://www.un.org/en/events/trafficvictimsday/

 

 

UN Special Envoy for Road Safety Mr Jean Todt’s message for World Day 2016

 

 

World Day of Remembrance ‪#‎WDR2015‬

UN Secretary-General’s message for World Day 2015

The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims is a time to reflect on the needless tragedies that occur each day on the world’s roads.
Despite improvements in road safety, we still face some shocking injury and fatality figures. Road traffic accidents kill an estimated 1.25 million people each year — 90 per cent of them in middle- and low-income countries. Such accidents are the leading cause of death among young people aged between 15 and 29. Almost half of all road traffic deaths are among pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists.
I call on governments to tighten enforcement of laws on speeding, drinking and driving, and to mandate and enforce the use of seat-belts, motorcycle helmets and child restraints — all of which have been shown to save lives.
The Second Global High-Level Conference on Road Safety, hosted by the Government of Brazil and supported by the World Health Organization, is being convened this week. Some 1500 delegates from more than 100 countries — including ministers of transport, health and interior — will meet to find ways to halve road traffic deaths and injuries by 2020 — the target set forth in the new Sustainable Development Goals agreed by Member States in September.
On this solemn day, let us re-commit to making our roads safe for all.

 

From the Statement by Dr Etienne Krug, WHO & UNRSC, 15 November 2015

On this World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, our hearts go out to the loved ones of those killed and seriously injured on the world’s roads. It is indeed a time to remember them. It is also time to acknowledge that much more must be done to avoid such tragedies. 2015 should be a turning point for road safety worldwide. In September governments around the world set an ambitious target to drastically reduce road traffic deaths and injuries by 50% by 2020. This week around 1500 delegates from more than 100 countries will gather in Brazil for the 2nd Global High-Level Conference on Road Safety. This will be a fantastic opportunity to plan concretely how to achieve this bold target by the end of the decade….
http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/en/

 

Video message from  Dr Etienne Krug, Chair of the UN Road Safety Collaboration:

 

From the Statement by Dr Etienne Krug, WHO, 15 November 2014

On this World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, we mourn those killed and injured on our roads. For many their lives have ended, but the pain and suffering of their loved ones endure. My sympathy goes out to all those whose lives have been transformed by such tragedies.Today half of countries are making progress on reducing the number of road traffic fatalities, while the number of deaths in other countries continues its quiet rise. There is still much work to do. The theme of this year’s World Day of Remembrance, “Speed Kills”, highlights the inherent risk of speed, a major cause of road traffic death and injury. It is well documented that a 5% cut in average speed can result in a 30% reduction in the number of fatal crashes. The good practice of setting urban speed limits of 50 kilometres per hour, which can be further reduced by local authorities around schools and residential areas, could save lives. In the context of the Decade of Action for Road Safety 2011-2020, greater action is needed to address speed and other risks such as drinking and driving and failing to use seat-belts, child restraints and motorcycle helmets. This annual World Day of Remembrance offers a place for the voices of road traffic victims and their families to be heard. They guide us – and all those tasked with ensuring safer roads – in all that we do. My colleagues and I wish you a successful World Day of Remembrance.
  • Video statement
  • http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/statement_2014/en/

 

From the UN Secretary-General, Mr Ban Ki-moon, 15 November 2014

I am continually inspired by the potential of youth to transform society. The World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims is a sobering reminder that crashes are the leading cause of death for people 15 to 29 years old. Road traffic crashes also claim many younger victims, with more than 500 children killed each day as they travel to and from school, playgrounds and the homes of family and friends. Millions of other people of all ages are seriously injured. This Day is about compassion and prevention. We mourn those who have perished on the roads. We console grieving families and friends. We raise awareness of the economic hardship so often faced by the bereaved. Last year on this Day, I was in Lithuania, which is one of many countries seriously addressing this issue. I was deeply moved by the silent spectre of a candlelight vigil in Vilnius featuring one flame for each person who had died on the country’s roads since 1990. Such tributes are a powerful testimony to the need for action. The focus of this year’s Day on the theme “Speed Kills” points the way forward. A number of governments have moved to address the problem of speeding in the context of the United Nations Decade of Action for Road Safety, which is being observed through the year 2020. China, France, Kenya, the Russian Federation and Turkey are among a growing number of countries adopting new laws, enhancing enforcement and redesigning their roads with speed bumps, rumble strips and other steps to slow traffic. As we aim to slow traffic, we are accelerating global action against road crashes. Working with partners, the United Nations is carrying out a number of initiatives, including preparing to convene the Second Global High-Level Conference on Road Safety to be hosted by Brazil in November 2015. On this World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, let us re-commit to making roads that are safe for all.

http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/UN_SG_statement_2014/en/

From the Statement by Michael Cramer, Chair of the EP TRAN Commission, 13 November 2014

“I rise today to remember the countless victims of road accidents worldwide and offer my sincerest condolences to their families.
A day like this one also remembers us about our political responsibility to reduce these tragic accidents.
Speeding is the number one reason for accidents on European roads. A default speed limit of 30 km/h (20mph) in residential areas would halve both, the breaking distance as well as the reaction time and therewith reduce fatal accidents by 42%! The likelihood of an accident being fatal for pedestrians and cyclists is merely 10% at a car speed of 30 km/h but rises up to 80% at a car speed of 50 km/h. This improvement in road safety would be achieved through an increase in journey times of just 10 – 20 seconds per kilometer. By this means we are able to improve everybody´s health and the environment would benefit, too, as harmful CO2 emissions would be cut by 12%, traffic smoothened and less stressful, air quality could be improved and noise reduced by at least 3 dB (perceived as a 50% reduction in noise).
Because of this, the European Parliament decided in 2008 together with the Council to implement effective measures to improve road safety in the EU. The European Parliament has since then been pushing for increased harmonisation in road traffic regulations. It also has already adopted an official recommendation to introduce an EU-wide default speed limit of 30 km/h in all residential areas and on all single-lane streets without separate bike paths in urban areas. When specific roads require an alternative speed limit, this decision should be taken at the local level.
Let us work together to achieve the goal of Mission Zero!”.

From the Message of UN Secretary General Mr Ban Ki-moon, 20th November 2011

Each day, nearly 3,500 people die on the roads. Tens of thousands more are injured. Families are broken apart. The futures of young people are dashed. Road accidents have become the leading cause of death for people aged 15 to 29. This is an unacceptable price to pay for mobility. …. On this World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, let us mobilize all possible contributions to improving road safety – from city planners to vehicle designers, from policy makers to road users. Let us honour those who have lost their lives on the world’s roads by acting to save the lives of others.”
Message in other languages http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/en/index.html 

 

From the Message of UN Secretary General, 21st November 2010

“On the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims we mourn the estimated 1.3 million people who lose their lives on the world’s streets and highways each year, and we renew our resolve to prevent further deaths.
            Many tragedies can be avoided through a set of proven, simple measures that benefit not only individuals and families but society at large.
Recognition is growing about the critical development and public health challenge posed by road traffic deaths and injuries….  I call on Member States, international agencies, civil society organizations, businesses and community leaders to ensure that the Decade leads to real improvements.  As a step in this direction, governments should release their national plans for the Decade when it is launched globally on 11 May 2011…….”
In various languages:  http://www.who.int/roadsafety/remembrance_day/en/index.html

 

From 64th session of UN GA Report, 2009; Note by Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, 15 November 2009

Call upon Member States to continue raising awareness about road safety at the international and national levels through the organization of advocacy events and by scaling up existing efforts, in particular by encouraging observation of the World Day of Remembrance of Road Traffic Victims and by inviting WHO, in collaboration with the regional commissions, to organize the second United Nations Global Road Safety Week;

 

From the Statement by Dr Etienne Krug, WHO, 15 November 2009

“…..From Global Remembrance to Global Action – this year’s World Day of Remembrance theme – suits the occasion, as this has been a year of milestone events in road safety.
In May we were honoured to personally meet with representatives of more than 70 associations in Brussels for the first Global Meeting of NGOs Advocating for Road Victims and Road Safety. We were awed by the depth of their commitment and by their rightful demands for action. The collective statement to governments which was prepared should serve as a powerful advocacy tool.
We were also pleased to release in June the Global status report on road safety, which allows countries to compare their road safety efforts with those of their neighbours. The report reminded us that not enough is done to protect those who are most vulnerable. It also confirmed that few countries have comprehensive road safety laws which are well enforced. I encourage you all to make use of this report in your advocacy work.
In a few days, more than 1000 people – ministers of transport, health and interior; officials from UN and other international agencies; and representatives of nongovernmental organizations, the private sector and foundations – will convene in Moscow for the First Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety. This is a unique opportunity to increase visibility and engagement. We hope that this Conference will result in a call for a much needed Decade of Action for Road Safety. We hope also that the voices of victims and their families will be heard loud and clear.
     We wish you a successful World Day of Remembrance.”
http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/media/news/2009/16_11_2009/en/ 

 

From the Statement by Dr Etienne Krug, WHO, 16 November 2008

“Today on this World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims, we at the World Health Organization turn our thoughts to the mothers, fathers, siblings, grandparents and friends who have lost loved ones on the world’s roads……….
…..For those of you who choose to be involved in some way in marking the World Day of Remembrance, we commend you for your strength and courage and we are grateful for your dedication to drawing attention to the issue in your communities and countries. 
Your very legitimate call to action does much to stimulate the political will of governments and all of us to recognize that more needs to be done……” 

 

From UN Address by Oman’s Ambassador Fuad Al Hinai, 2005

The idea of a World Day of Remembrance was initiated about 11 years ago by a number of non-governmental organizations and has since been embraced by organizations in different parts of the world.   It is a day when we remember all those killed and injured in road crashes as well as give thanks to the emergency services who are always the first to arrive at a road crash, the medical personnel whose task it is to revive, treat and rehabilitate the injured and the families who go through grief because of the loss of a loved one and for the love and care they unselfishly give to their injured.
World Day of Remembrance is a chance to remember people like Faisal, Nauf, Aron, Lyndon, Mansoor and thousand others, and to recognize the way their deaths and injuries have impacted individuals, families and communities.  Operative paragraph 10 invites Member States to recognize the 3rd Sunday in November of every year as the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims.

 

 

Messages & Thoughts